Linuxではデフォルトでインストールされているarp-scanコマンド。

macOSで利用する場合は、Homebrewでインストールしましょう。

brew install arp-scan

インストールできました。

ラズパイにsshする時に必要になるipアドレスを調べてみましょう。

sudo arp-scan -l
Password:
Interface: en0, datalink type: EN10MB (Ethernet)
Starting arp-scan 1.9.5 with 256 hosts (https://github.com/royhills/arp-scan)
192.168.100.1   00:a0:de:6a:ac:51       YAMAHA CORPORATION
192.168.100.2   f0:99:bf:04:35:98       Apple, Inc.
192.168.100.3   f0:99:bf:04:35:98       Apple, Inc.
192.168.100.4   00:b3:62:dc:f9:91       (Unknown)
192.168.100.20  00:22:cf:fa:57:b3       PLANEX COMMUNICATIONS INC.
192.168.100.6   dc:ef:ca:89:91:d6       (Unknown)
192.168.100.9   d8:00:4d:ee:5c:7d       Apple, Inc.
192.168.100.12  60:f8:1d:be:e2:ac       Apple, Inc.
192.168.100.15  78:88:6d:c3:86:58       (Unknown)

518 packets received by filter, 0 packets dropped by kernel
Ending arp-scan 1.9.5: 256 hosts scanned in 1.851 seconds (138.30 hosts/sec). 10 responded

ラズパイにはPLANEXの無線LAN子機をつけているので、今回の場合は192.168.100.20になります。

ssh pi@192.168.100.20

arp-scan便利ですね。

しかし、Apple製品多いな…

manをはっておこう…

man arp-scan
ARP-SCAN(1)                                                        ARP-SCAN(1)



NNAAMMEE
       arp-scan - The ARP scanner

SSYYNNOOPPSSIISS
       aarrpp--ssccaann [_o_p_t_i_o_n_s] [_h_o_s_t_s...]

       Target  hosts  must  be specified on the command line unless the ----ffiillee
       option is given, in which case the targets are read from the  specified
       file  instead, or the ----llooccaallnneett option is used, in which case the tar-
       gets are generated from the network interface IP address and netmask.

       You will need to be root, or aarrpp--ssccaann must be SUID root,  in  order  to
       run  aarrpp--ssccaann,  because  the  functions  that it uses to read and write
       packets require root privilege.

       The target hosts can be specified as IP addresses  or  hostnames.   You
       can  also specify the target as IIPPnneettwwoorrkk//bbiittss (e.g. 192.168.1.0/24) to
       specify all hosts in the given network (network and broadcast addresses
       included), IIPPssttaarrtt--IIPPeenndd (e.g. 192.168.1.3-192.168.1.27) to specify all
       hosts   in   the   inclusive   range,   or   IIPPnneettwwoorrkk::NNeettMMaasskk    (e.g.
       192.168.1.0:255.255.255.0)  to  specify  all hosts in the given network
       and mask.

DDEESSCCRRIIPPTTIIOONN
       aarrpp--ssccaann sends ARP packets to hosts on the local network  and  displays
       any  responses  that  are received. The network interface to use can be
       specified with the ----iinntteerrffaaccee option. If this option is  not  present,
       aarrpp--ssccaann will search the system interface list for the lowest numbered,
       configured up interface (excluding  loopback).   By  default,  the  ARP
       packets  are sent to the Ethernet broadcast address, ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff,
       but that can be changed with the ----ddeessttaaddddrr option.

       The target hosts to scan may be specified in  one  of  three  ways:  by
       specifying  the  targets on the command line; by specifying a file con-
       taining the targets with  the  ----ffiillee  option;  or  by  specifying  the
       ----llooccaallnneett  option  which  causes  all  possible  hosts  on the network
       attached to the interface (as defined  by  the  interface  address  and
       mask)  to  be scanned. For hosts specified on the command line, or with
       the ----ffiillee option, you can use either IP addresses or  hostnames.   You
       can  also  use network specifications IIPPnneettwwoorrkk//bbiittss, IIPPssttaarrtt--IIPPeenndd, or
       IIPPnneettwwoorrkk::NNeettMMaasskk.

       The list of target hosts is stored in memory.  Each host in  this  list
       uses  28  bytes of memory, so scanning a Class-B network (65,536 hosts)
       requires about 1.75MB of memory for the list, and  scanning  a  Class-A
       (16,777,216 hosts) requires about 448MB.

       aarrpp--ssccaann  supports Ethernet and 802.11 wireless networks. It could also
       support token ring and FDDI, but they have not been tested. It does not
       support  serial links such as PPP or SLIP, because ARP is not supported
       on them.

       The ARP protocol is a layer-2 (datalink layer) protocol that is used to
       determine  a  host's  layer-2 address given its layer-3 (network layer)
       address. ARP was designed to work with any layer-2 and layer-3  address
       format,  but  the  most  common  use is to map IP addresses to Ethernet
       hardware addresses, and this is what aarrpp--ssccaann supports. ARP only  oper-
       ates  on the local network, and cannot be routed. Although the ARP pro-
       tocol makes use of IP addresses, it is not  an  IP-based  protocol  and
       aarrpp--ssccaann can be used on an interface that is not configured for IP.

       ARP is only used by IPv4 hosts. IPv6 uses NDP (neighbour discovery pro-
       tocol) instead, which is a different protocol and is not  supported  by
       aarrpp--ssccaann.

       One  ARP  packet is sent for each for each target host, with the target
       protocol address (the ar$tpa field) set to the IP address of this host.
       If  a  host  does not respond, then the ARP packet will be re-sent once
       more.  The maximum number of retries can be changed  with  the  ----rreettrryy
       option.   Reducing  the number of retries will reduce the scanning time
       at the possible risk of missing some results due to packet loss.

       You can specify the bandwidth that aarrpp--ssccaann will use for  the  outgoing
       ARP  packets  with the ----bbaannddwwiiddtthh option.  By default, it uses a band-
       width of 256000 bits per second. Increasing the bandwidth  will  reduce
       the  scanning time, but setting the bandwidth too high may result in an
       ARP storm which can disrupt network operation.  Also, setting the band-
       width  too  high can send packets faster than the network interface can
       transmit them, which will eventually fill the kernel's transmit  buffer
       resulting in the error message: _N_o _b_u_f_f_e_r _s_p_a_c_e _a_v_a_i_l_a_b_l_e.  Another way
       to specify the outgoing ARP packet rate is with the ----iinntteerrvvaall  option,
       which is an alternative way to modify the same underlying parameter.

       The  time  taken to perform a single-pass scan (i.e. with ----rreettrryy==11) is
       given by:

       time = n*i + t + o

       Where _n is the number of hosts in the list,  _i  is  the  time  interval
       between  packets (specified with ----iinntteerrvvaall, or calculated from ----bbaanndd--
       wwiiddtthh), _t is the timeout value (specified with ----ttiimmeeoouutt) and _o is  the
       overhead  time  taken  to  load  the targets into the list and read the
       MAC/Vendor mapping files.  For small lists of hosts, the timeout  value
       will  dominate,  but  for  large  lists the packet interval is the most
       important value.

       With 65,536 hosts, the default bandwidth of 256,000 bits/second  (which
       results in a packet interval of 2ms), the default timeout of 500ms, and
       a single pass ( ----rreettrryy==11), and assuming an overhead of 1  second,  the
       scan would take 65536*0.002 + 0.5 + 1 = 132.57 seconds, or about 2 min-
       utes 13 seconds.

       Any part of the outgoing ARP packet may be modified through the use  of
       the  various  ----aarrppXXXXXX  options.   The use of some of these options may
       make the outgoing ARP packet non  RFC  compliant.  Different  operating
       systems  handle the various non standard ARP packets in different ways,
       and this may be used to fingerprint  these  systems.   See  aarrpp--ffiinnggeerr--
       pprriinntt(1)  for  information  about  a script which uses these options to
       fingerprint the target operating system.

       The table below summarises the options that  change  the  outgoing  ARP
       packet. In this table, the _F_i_e_l_d column gives the ARP packet field name
       from RFC 826, _B_i_t_s specifies the number of bits in  the  field,  _O_p_t_i_o_n
       shows  the  aarrpp--ssccaann  option  to modify this field, and _N_o_t_e_s gives the
       default value and any other notes.

       +---------------------------------------------------------------+
       |                 OOuuttggooiinngg AARRPP PPaacckkeett OOppttiioonnss                   |
       +-------+------+----------+-------------------------------------+
       |FFiieelldd  | BBiittss | OOppttiioonn   | NNootteess                               |
       +-------+------+----------+-------------------------------------+
       |ar$hrd | 16   | --arphrd | Default is 1 (ARPHRD_ETHER)         |
       |ar$pro | 16   | --arppro | Default is 0x0800                   |
       |ar$hln | 8    | --arphln | Default is 6 (ETH_ALEN)             |
       |ar$pln | 8    | --arppln | Default is 4 (IPv4)                 |
       |ar$op  | 16   | --arpop  | Default is 1 (ARPOP_REQUEST)        |
       |ar$sha | 48   | --arpsha | Default is interface h/w address    |
       |ar$spa | 32   | --arpspa | Default is interface IP address     |
       |ar$tha | 48   | --arptha | Default is zero (00:00:00:00:00:00) |
       |ar$tpa | 32   | None     | Set to the target host IP address   |
       +-------+------+----------+-------------------------------------+

       The most commonly used outgoing ARP packet option  is  ----aarrppssppaa,  which
       sets  the  source IP address in the ARP packet.  This option allows the
       outgoing ARP packet to use a different source IP address from the  out-
       going  interface  address.  With this option it is possible to use aarrpp--
       ssccaann on an interface with no IP address configured, which can be useful
       if  you want to ensure that the testing host does not interact with the
       network being tested.

       WWaarrnniinngg:: SSeettttiinngg aarr$$ssppaa ttoo tthhee ddeessttiinnaattiioonn IIPP aaddddrreessss ccaann ddiissrruupptt  ssoommee
       ooppeerraattiinngg  ssyysstteemmss,, aass tthheeyy aassssuummee tthheerree iiss aann IIPP aaddddrreessss ccllaasshh iiff tthheeyy
       rreecceeiivvee aann AARRPP rreeqquueesstt ffoorr tthheeiirr oowwnn aaddddrreessss..

       It is also possible to change the values in the Ethernet  frame  header
       that  precedes  the ARP packet in the outgoing packets. The table below
       summarises the options that change values in the Ethernet frame header.

       +-------------------------------------------------------------------+
       |                 OOuuttggooiinngg EEtthheerrnneett FFrraammee OOppttiioonnss                   |
       +---------------+------+-------------+------------------------------+
       |FFiieelldd          | BBiittss | OOppttiioonn      | NNootteess                        |
       +---------------+------+-------------+------------------------------+
       |Dest Address   | 48   | --destaddr  | Default is ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff |
       |Source Address | 48   | --srcaddr   | Default is interface address |
       |Protocol Type  | 16   | --prototype | Default is 0x0806            |
       +---------------+------+-------------+------------------------------+

       The  most  commonly  used outgoing Ethernet frame option is ----ddeessttaaddddrr,
       which sets the destination Ethernet address for the ARP packet.  ----pprroo--
       ttoottyyppee is not often used, because it will cause the packet to be inter-
       preted as a different Ethernet protocol.

       Any ARP responses that are received are displayed in the following for-
       mat:

       <IP Address>   <Hardware Address>   <Vendor Details>

       Where  IIPP  AAddddrreessss is the IP address of the responding target, HHaarrddwwaarree
       AAddddrreessss is its  Ethernet  hardware  address  (also  known  as  the  MAC
       address)  and  VVeennddoorr  DDeettaaiillss are the vendor details, decoded from the
       hardware address.  The output fields are  separated  by  a  single  tab
       character.

       The  responses  are  displayed in the order they are received, which is
       not always the same order as the requests were sent because some  hosts
       may respond faster than others.

       The  vendor decoding uses the files _i_e_e_e_-_o_u_i_._t_x_t, _i_e_e_e_-_i_a_b_._t_x_t and _m_a_c_-
       _v_e_n_d_o_r_._t_x_t, which are supplied with  aarrpp--ssccaann.   The  _i_e_e_e_-_o_u_i_._t_x_t  and
       _i_e_e_e_-_i_a_b_._t_x_t  files are generated from the OUI and IAB data on the IEEE
       website at _h_t_t_p_:_/_/_s_t_a_n_d_a_r_d_s_-_o_u_i_._i_e_e_e_._o_r_g_/_o_u_i_/_o_u_i_._t_x_t  and  _h_t_t_p_:_/_/_s_t_a_n_-
       _d_a_r_d_s_._i_e_e_e_._o_r_g_/_r_e_g_a_u_t_h_/_o_u_i_/_i_a_b_._t_x_t.   The Perl scripts ggeett--oouuii and ggeett--
       iiaabb, which are included in the aarrpp--ssccaann package, can be used to  update
       these  files  with the latest data from the IEEE website.  The _m_a_c_-_v_e_n_-
       _d_o_r_._t_x_t file contains other MAC to Vendor mappings that are not covered
       by  the IEEE OUI and IAB files, and can be used to add custom mappings.

       Almost all hosts that support IP  will  respond  to  aarrpp--ssccaann  if  they
       receive  an ARP packet with the target protocol address (ar$tpa) set to
       their IP address.  This includes firewalls and other hosts with IP fil-
       tering  that drop all IP traffic from the testing system. For this rea-
       son, aarrpp--ssccaann is a useful tool to quickly determine all the  active  IP
       hosts on a given Ethernet network segment.

OOPPTTIIOONNSS
       Where  an  option takes a value, that value is specified as a letter in
       angle brackets. The letter indicates the type of data that is expected:

       <<ss>>    A character string, e.g. --file=hostlist.txt.

       <<ii>>    An  integer,  which can be specified as a decimal number or as a
              hexadecimal number if preceeded with 0x, e.g.  --arppro=2048  or
              --arpro=0x0800.

       <<ff>>    A floating point decimal number, e.g. --backoff=1.5.

       <<mm>>    An  Ethernet  MAC  address, which can be specified either in the
              format 01:23:45:67:89:ab, or as  01-23-45-67-89-ab.  The  alpha-
              betic  hex  characters  may  be either upper or lower case. E.g.
              --arpsha=01:23:45:67:89:ab.

       <<aa>>    An IPv4 address, e.g. --arpspa=10.0.0.1

       <<hh>>    Binary data specified as a hexadecimal string, which should  not
              include  a  leading  0x.  The  alphabetic  hex characters may be
              either upper or lower case. E.g. --padding=aaaaaaaaaaaa

       <<xx>>    Something else. See the description of the option for details.

       ----hheellpp oorr --hh
              Display this usage message and exit.

       ----ffiillee==<<ss>> oorr --ff <<ss>>
              Read hostnames or addresses from the specified file  instead  of
              from  the command line. One name or IP address per line. Use "-"
              for standard input.

       ----llooccaallnneett oorr --ll
              Generate addresses from network  interface  configuration.   Use
              the  network  interface  IP address and network mask to generate
              the list of target host addresses.  The list  will  include  the
              network  and  broadcast  addresses,  so  an interface address of
              10.0.0.1 with netmask 255.255.255.0 would  generate  256  target
              hosts  from  10.0.0.0  to 10.0.0.255 inclusive.  If you use this
              option, you cannot specify the --file option or specify any tar-
              get hosts on the command line.  The interface specifications are
              taken from the interface that arp-scan will use,  which  can  be
              changed with the --interface option.

       ----rreettrryy==<<ii>> oorr --rr <<ii>>
              Set total number of attempts per host to <i>, default=2.

       ----ttiimmeeoouutt==<<ii>> oorr --tt <<ii>>
              Set initial per host timeout to <i> ms, default=500.  This time-
              out is for the first packet sent to each host.  subsequent time-
              outs  are  multiplied  by  the  backoff factor which is set with
              --backoff.

       ----iinntteerrvvaall==<<xx>> oorr --ii <<xx>>
              Set minimum packet interval to <x>.  This controls the  outgoing
              bandwidth  usage  by  limiting  the rate at which packets can be
              sent. The packet interval will be no smaller than  this  number.
              If you want to use up to a given bandwidth, then it is easier to
              use the --bandwidth option instead.  The interval  specified  is
              in  milliseconds  by  default,  or  in  microseconds  if  "u" is
              appended to the value.

       ----bbaannddwwiiddtthh==<<xx>> oorr --BB <<xx>>
              Set desired outbound  bandwidth  to  <x>,  default=256000.   The
              value is in bits per second by default. If you append "K" to the
              value, then the units are kilobits per sec; and  if  you  append
              "M"  to  the  value, the units are megabits per second.  The "K"
              and "M" suffixes represent the decimal, not  binary,  multiples.
              So  64K is 64000, not 65536.  You cannot specify both --interval
              and --bandwidth because they are just different ways  to  change
              the same underlying parameter.

       ----bbaacckkooffff==<<ff>> oorr --bb <<ff>>
              Set  timeout  backoff factor to <f>, default=1.50.  The per-host
              timeout is multiplied by this factor after each timeout. So,  if
              the  number  of  retries  is  3, the initial per-host timeout is
              500ms and the backoff factor is 1.5, then the first timeout will
              be 500ms, the second 750ms and the third 1125ms.

       ----vveerrbboossee oorr --vv
              Display  verbose  progress  messages.   Use  more  than once for
              greater effect:

              1 - Display the network address and mask used when the  --local-
              net  option  is  specified,  display any nonzero packet padding,
              display packets received from unknown hosts, and show when  each
              pass through the list completes.

              2 - Show each packet sent and received, when entries are removed
              from the list, the pcap filter string, and counts of  MAC/Vendor
              mapping entries.

              3 - Display the host list before scanning starts.

       ----vveerrssiioonn oorr --VV
              Display program version and exit.

       ----rraannddoomm oorr --RR
              Randomise  the  host  list.  This option randomises the order of
              the hosts in the host list, so the ARP packets are sent  to  the
              hosts in a random order. It uses the Knuth shuffle algorithm.

       ----rraannddoommsseeeedd==<<ii>>
              Use <i> to seed the pseudo random number generator.  This option
              seeds the PRNG with the specified number, which can be useful if
              you want to ensure that the random host list is reproducable. By
              default, the PRNG is seeded with an  unpredictable  value.  This
              option  is  only effective in conjunction with the --random (-R)
              option.

       ----nnuummeerriicc oorr --NN
              IP addresses only, no hostnames.  With this  option,  all  hosts
              must  be specified as IP addresses. Hostnames are not permitted.
              No DNS lookups will be performed.

       ----ssnnaapp==<<ii>> oorr --nn <<ii>>
              Set the pcap snap length to <i>. Default=64.  This specifies the
              frame capture length. This length includes the data-link header.
              The default is normally sufficient.

       ----iinntteerrffaaccee==<<ss>> oorr --II <<ss>>
              Use network interface <s>.  If this  option  is  not  specified,
              arp-scan  will  search  the system interface list for the lowest
              numbered, configured up  interface  (excluding  loopback).   The
              interface specified must support ARP.

       ----qquuiieett oorr --qq
              Only  display  minimal  output.  No  protocol decoding.  If this
              option is specified, then only the IP address  and  MAC  address
              are displayed for each responding host.  No protocol decoding is
              performed and the OUI mapping files are not used.

       ----ppllaaiinn oorr --xx
              Display plain output showing only responding hosts.  This option
              supresses  the  printing of the header and footer text, and only
              displays one line for each responding host. Useful if the output
              will be parsed by a script.

       ----iiggnnoorreedduuppss oorr --gg
              Don't  display duplicate packets.  By default, duplicate packets
              are displayed and are flagged with "(DUP: n)".

       ----oouuiiffiillee==<<ss>> oorr --OO <<ss>>
              Use IEEE Ethernet OUI to  vendor  mapping  file  <s>.   If  this
              option is not specified, the default filename is ieee-oui.txt in
              the current directory. If that  is  not  found,  then  the  file
              /usr/local/share/arp-scan/ieee-oui.txt is used.

       ----iiaabbffiillee==<<ss>> oorr --OO <<ss>>
              Use  IEEE  Ethernet  IAB  to  vendor  mapping file <s>.  If this
              option is not specified, the default filename is ieee-iab.txt in
              the  current  directory.  If  that  is  not found, then the file
              /usr/local/share/arp-scan/ieee-iab.txt is used.

       ----mmaaccffiillee==<<ss>> oorr --OO <<ss>>
              Use custom Ethernet MAC to vendor mapping  file  <s>.   If  this
              option  is not specified, the default filename is mac-vendor.txt
              in the current directory. If that is not found,  then  the  file
              /usr/local/share/arp-scan/mac-vendor.txt is used.

       ----ssrrccaaddddrr==<<mm>> oorr --SS <<mm>>
              Set  the  source  Ethernet  MAC  address  to <m>.  This sets the
              48-bit hardware address in the Ethernet frame header for  outgo-
              ing  ARP packets. It does not change the hardware address in the
              ARP packet, see --arpsha for  details  on  how  to  change  that
              address.   The  default  is the Ethernet address of the outgoing
              interface.

       ----ddeessttaaddddrr==<<mm>> oorr --TT <<mm>>
              Send the packets to Ethernet  MAC  address  <m>  This  sets  the
              48-bit  destination  address  in the Ethernet frame header.  The
              default is the broadcast address ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff.  Most  oper-
              ating  systems  will  also respond if the ARP request is sent to
              their MAC address, or to a multicast address that they are  lis-
              tening on.

       ----aarrppsshhaa==<<mm>> oorr --uu <<mm>>
              Use  <m> as the ARP source Ethernet address This sets the 48-bit
              ar$sha field in the ARP packet It does not change  the  hardware
              address in the frame header, see --srcaddr for details on how to
              change that address. The default is the Ethernet address of  the
              outgoing interface.

       ----aarrpptthhaa==<<mm>> oorr --ww <<mm>>
              Use  <m> as the ARP target Ethernet address This sets the 48-bit
              ar$tha field in the ARP packet The default is zero, because this
              field is not used for ARP request packets.

       ----pprroottoottyyppee==<<ii>> oorr --yy <<ii>>
              Set  the  Ethernet  protocol  type to <i>, default=0x0806.  This
              sets the 16-bit  protocol  type  field  in  the  Ethernet  frame
              header.   Setting this to a non-default value will result in the
              packet being ignored by the target, or sent to the wrong  proto-
              col stack.

       ----aarrpphhrrdd==<<ii>> oorr --HH <<ii>>
              Use  <i>  for  the  ARP hardware type, default=1.  This sets the
              16-bit ar$hrd field in the ARP packet.  The normal  value  is  1
              (ARPHRD_ETHER).  Most,  but not all, operating systems will also
              respond to 6 (ARPHRD_IEEE802). A  few  systems  respond  to  any
              value.

       ----aarrpppprroo==<<ii>> oorr --pp <<ii>>
              Use  <i>  for  the ARP protocol type, default=0x0800.  This sets
              the 16-bit ar$pro field in the ARP packet.  Most operating  sys-
              tems  only  respond  to  0x0800  (IPv4) but some will respond to
              other values as well.

       ----aarrpphhllnn==<<ii>> oorr --aa <<ii>>
              Set the hardware address length to <i>,  default=6.   This  sets
              the  8-bit  ar$hln field in the ARP packet.  It sets the claimed
              length of the hardware address in the ARP packet. Setting it  to
              any  value  other  than the default will make the packet non RFC
              compliant.  Some operating  systems  may  still  respond  to  it
              though.   Note  that the actual lengths of the ar$sha and ar$tha
              fields in the ARP packet are not changed by this option; it only
              changes the ar$hln field.

       ----aarrppppllnn==<<ii>> oorr --PP <<ii>>
              Set  the  protocol  address length to <i>, default=4.  This sets
              the 8-bit ar$pln field in the ARP packet.  It sets  the  claimed
              length  of the protocol address in the ARP packet. Setting it to
              any value other than the default will make the  packet  non  RFC
              compliant.   Some  operating  systems  may  still  respond to it
              though.  Note that the actual lengths of the ar$spa  and  ar$tpa
              fields in the ARP packet are not changed by this option; it only
              changes the ar$pln field.

       ----aarrppoopp==<<ii>> oorr --oo <<ii>>
              Use <i> for the ARP operation, default=1.  This sets the  16-bit
              ar$op field in the ARP packet.  Most operating systems will only
              respond to the value 1 (ARPOP_REQUEST).  However,  some  systems
              will respond to other values as well.

       ----aarrppssppaa==<<aa>> oorr --ss <<aa>>
              Use  <a> as the source IP address.  The address should be speci-
              fied in dotted quad format; or the literal string "dest",  which
              sets  the  source  address  to  be  the  same as the target host
              address.  This sets the 32-bit ar$spa field in the  ARP  packet.
              Some  operating systems check this, and will only respond if the
              source address is within the network of the receiving interface.
              Others  don't  care, and will respond to any source address.  By
              default, the outgoing interface address is used.

              WARNING: Setting ar$spa to the destination IP address  can  dis-
              rupt  some  operating  systems,  as  they  assume there is an IP
              address clash if they receive  an  ARP  request  for  their  own
              address.

       ----ppaaddddiinngg==<<hh>> oorr --AA <<hh>>
              Specify  padding after packet data.  Set the padding data to hex
              value <h>. This data is appended to the end of the  ARP  packet,
              after the data.  Most, if not all, operating systems will ignore
              any padding. The default is no padding,  although  the  Ethernet
              driver  on  the sending system may pad the packet to the minimum
              Ethernet frame length.

       ----llllcc oorr --LL
              Use RFC 1042 LLC framing with SNAP.  This option causes the out-
              going  ARP  packets to use IEEE 802.2 framing with a SNAP header
              as described in RFC 1042. The  default  is  to  use  Ethernet-II
              framing.   arp-scan will decode and display received ARP packets
              in either Ethernet-II or IEEE 802.2 formats irrespective of this
              option.

       ----vvllaann==<<ii>> oorr --QQ <<ii>>
              Use  802.1Q  tagging  with  VLAN id <i>.  This option causes the
              outgoing ARP packets to use 802.1Q VLAN tagging with a  VLAN  ID
              of  <i>, which should be in the range 0 to 4095 inclusive.  arp-
              scan will always decode and  display  received  ARP  packets  in
              802.1Q format irrespective of this option.

       ----ppccaappssaavveeffiillee==<<ss>> oorr --WW <<ss>>
              Write received packets to pcap savefile <s>.  This option causes
              received ARP responses to be written to the specified pcap save-
              file  as  well as being decoded and displayed. This savefile can
              be analysed with programs that understand the pcap file  format,
              such as "tcpdump" and "wireshark".

       ----rrtttt oorr --DD
              Display the packet round-trip time.

FFIILLEESS
       _/_u_s_r_/_l_o_c_a_l_/_s_h_a_r_e_/_a_r_p_-_s_c_a_n_/_i_e_e_e_-_o_u_i_._t_x_t
              List  of IEEE OUI (Organisationally Unique Identifier) to vendor
              mappings.

       _/_u_s_r_/_l_o_c_a_l_/_s_h_a_r_e_/_a_r_p_-_s_c_a_n_/_i_e_e_e_-_i_a_b_._t_x_t
              List of IEEE IAB (Individual Address Block) to vendor  mappings.

       _/_u_s_r_/_l_o_c_a_l_/_s_h_a_r_e_/_a_r_p_-_s_c_a_n_/_m_a_c_-_v_e_n_d_o_r_._t_x_t
              List of other Ethernet MAC to vendor mappings.

EEXXAAMMPPLLEESS
       The  example  below  shows  aarrpp--ssccaann  being  used  to  scan the network
       _1_9_2_._1_6_8_._0_._0_/_2_4 using the network interface _e_t_h_0.

       $ arp-scan --interface=eth0 192.168.0.0/24
       Interface: eth0, datalink type: EN10MB (Ethernet)
       Starting arp-scan 1.4 with 256 hosts (http://www.nta-monitor.com/tools-resources/security-tools/arp-scan/)
       192.168.0.1     00:c0:9f:09:b8:db       QUANTA COMPUTER, INC.
       192.168.0.3     00:02:b3:bb:66:98       Intel Corporation
       192.168.0.5     00:02:a5:90:c3:e6       Compaq Computer Corporation
       192.168.0.6     00:c0:9f:0b:91:d1       QUANTA COMPUTER, INC.
       192.168.0.12    00:02:b3:46:0d:4c       Intel Corporation
       192.168.0.13    00:02:a5:de:c2:17       Compaq Computer Corporation
       192.168.0.87    00:0b:db:b2:fa:60       Dell ESG PCBA Test
       192.168.0.90    00:02:b3:06:d7:9b       Intel Corporation
       192.168.0.105   00:13:72:09:ad:76       Dell Inc.
       192.168.0.153   00:10:db:26:4d:52       Juniper Networks, Inc.
       192.168.0.191   00:01:e6:57:8b:68       Hewlett-Packard Company
       192.168.0.251   00:04:27:6a:5d:a1       Cisco Systems, Inc.
       192.168.0.196   00:30:c1:5e:58:7d       HEWLETT-PACKARD

       13 packets received by filter, 0 packets dropped by kernel
       Ending arp-scan: 256 hosts scanned in 3.386 seconds (75.61 hosts/sec).  13 responded

       This next example shows aarrpp--ssccaann being used to scan the  local  network
       after configuring the network interface with DHCP using _p_u_m_p.

       # pump
       # ifconfig eth0
       eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:D0:B7:0B:DD:C7
                 inet addr:10.0.84.178  Bcast:10.0.84.183  Mask:255.255.255.248
                 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
                 RX packets:46335 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
                 TX packets:1542776 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
                 collisions:1644 txqueuelen:1000
                 RX bytes:6184146 (5.8 MiB)  TX bytes:348887835 (332.7 MiB)
       # arp-scan --localnet
       Interface: eth0, datalink type: EN10MB (Ethernet)
       Starting arp-scan 1.4 with 8 hosts (http://www.nta-monitor.com/tools-resources/security-tools/arp-scan/)
       10.0.84.179     00:02:b3:63:c7:57       Intel Corporation
       10.0.84.177     00:d0:41:08:be:e8       AMIGO TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD.
       10.0.84.180     00:02:b3:bd:82:9b       Intel Corporation
       10.0.84.181     00:02:b3:1f:73:da       Intel Corporation

       4 packets received by filter, 0 packets dropped by kernel
       Ending arp-scan 1.4: 8 hosts scanned in 0.820 seconds (9.76 hosts/sec).  4 responded

AAUUTTHHOORR
       Roy Hills <Roy.Hills@nta-monitor.com>

SSEEEE AALLSSOO
       ggeett--oouuii(1)

       ggeett--iiaabb(1)

       aarrpp--ffiinnggeerrpprriinntt(1)

       RRFFCC 882266 - An Ethernet Address Resolution Protocol

       _h_t_t_p_:_/_/_w_w_w_._n_t_a_-_m_o_n_i_t_o_r_._c_o_m_/_w_i_k_i_/ The arp-scan wiki page.

       _h_t_t_p_s_:_/_/_g_i_t_h_u_b_._c_o_m_/_r_o_y_h_i_l_l_s_/_a_r_p_-_s_c_a_n The arp-scan homepage.



                                August 13, 2016                    ARP-SCAN(1)